“I am a creator. I love making things, whether it’s baking, drawing, designing, or painting. I love to create something new everyday.

I have had an unconventional learning path. I’ve tried a lot of different ways of learning and found that I’m best using my hands and making things to learn. I’ve had two pieces walk in Boston Fashion Week, I went to the White House, I have a piece in the MIT Museum, and I’ve been featured in Wired Magazine. Working with my hands works for me.

Something you might not know about me: I ride a unicycle.”

Susan asks Kate:

So, you stand up when you play. How come?
It’s more fun and I can dance around more and interact with my audience.

That’s quite a cello rig you have. How did you come up with your design?
I started out with the classic guitar strap cello strap, but it kept rotating the cello in the wrong direction so I decided to make my own with rope.

What is your favorite part of the trio?
I like being able to play with other people. Often as a classical musician I didn’t practice much because I got lonely. In Tatu Mianzi we always share the melody and other parts, which is much more fun for me.

You met President Obama. What was that like?
I made a wheelchair attachment and presented it to the President at the White House Science Fair. On the one hand, it was super awesome and totally amazing to meet him. On the other hand, it felt like nothing new because I’d seen him so many times on TV. It was like, “Oh hey, there’s Obama!”

What kind of music interests you most?
I love gypsy music.

What is your favorite performance medium and why?
Busking. It’s like being paid to people watch and we never know exactly what’s going to happen when we go busking.

Kate in the News:

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Boston Fashion Show

A mighty masterpiece made with a laser cutter, now it’s three pieces in Boston Fashion Week, and another piece in the Museum of Design Atlanta

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White House Science Fair 2015

Would you like to try our wheelchair, Mr. President?

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Science Guys

Kate and Bill plotting the next scientific breakthrough